23 facts about American robin

American robin

Common migratory songbird

There are many interesting stories about American robins. They travel a lot, sometimes pay unexpected visit to other continent and can cooperate to fend off predators. They even have a color named after them.
1.Its Latin name is Turdus migratorius and it’s a member of Turdidae family.
2.American robins are native to North America.
They can be found from Alaska to northern Mexico.
3.They were given their name by colonial settlers who noticed resemblance to European robin (Erithacus rubecula).
4.They are medium sized birds.
Body length is 23 to 28 cm (9.1 to 11.0 in) and wingspan range from 31 to 41 cm (12 to 16 in). Males are heavier than females. Average weight of this species is 77 g (2.7 oz).
5.Males are more colorful than females.
Juveniles can also be duller regardless of sex.
6.They are migratory birds and can travel a long distance.
Flying a 400 km (250 mi) a day a robin can travel up to 5000 km (3100 mi) during spring migration. Most of the time they travel during day, but sometimes are forced to do additional effort and fly during nighttime.
7.American robin is not a loyal husband.
Because they are migratory birds, they often seek for new partner each season. While trying to impress a female they sing beautiful melodic songs, shake their wings, spread tailfeathers and puff their throats.
8.American robins are omnivorous.
60% of their diet consists of fruits and berries while 40% of small invertebrates like caterpillars, grasshoppers, earthworms and beetle grubs.
9.While hunting, they rely mostly on vision.
Other senses used to locate prey are smell (olfaction) and hearing.
10.Their songs are really complicated and change regarding the time of the day.
American robin
23 facts about American robin

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